New Orleans Beignets

Beignets are the quintessential Big Easy breakfast bite, perfect for celebrating Mardi Gras or any time you crave authentic Creole cooking. We’ll show you how to make New Orleans-style beignets from scratch and bring the flavors of the French Quarter home.
Beignets are the quintessential Big Easy breakfast bite, perfect for celebrating Mardi Gras or any time you crave authentic Creole cooking. We’ll show you how to make New Orleans-style beignets from scratch and bring the flavors of the French Quarter home.


Ingredients
  • 3 cups (14 oz) flour
  • 1½ teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 package instant yeast or active dry yeast (if using active dry yeast, see Chef’s Tip below)
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 Tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Oil for frying
  • Powdered sugar, to taste

Preparation
  1. In a small bowl, mix together the flour, salt, and instant yeast (if using active dry yeast, see Chef’s Tip below).
  2. Heat the milk until scalding. It should just begin to steam, but not boil (about 180°F/82°C).
  3. Combine the sugar butter and butter in a large mixing bowl. Pour the steaming milk over the top and stir so that the butter melts and the sugar dissolves. Allow the mixture to cool until it’s lukewarm; the temperature needs to be lower than 115°F/46°C to avoid killing any yeast.
  4. Add the egg to the milk mixture and whisk to combine.
  5. Add the vanilla extract to the milk mixture and whisk to combine.
  6. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix well to combine. (Alternatively, you can mix the dough in a stand mixer with a paddle attachment until combined.)
  7. Place the dough on a floured counter and knead it until it’s soft and pliable, about 3-5 minutes. (Alternatively, you can knead the dough in a stand mixer with a dough hook on medium speed until a smooth and sticky dough forms.)
  8. Place your kneaded dough into a large, lightly oiled bowl. Cover it with plastic wrap and allow it to rise for about 1 hour, or until it has doubled in size.